Enabling Adobe Flash on a Chomebook

Have you run into the issue of not being able to access a website due to Adobe Flash not being enabled? This happened to me during a recent lesson, and after a quick in-class Google, I figured out how to enable Adobe Flash on a Chromebook. This short blog post explains exactly how to fix this problem so that you don't run into the same mid-class problem that I did!My students were working on a simple activity in class last week–at least I thought it was simple.
 
They were to take a virtual tour of a medieval manor.
They were to answer questions regarding that tour.
They were to drag and drop pieces to label the parts of a manor.
 
I assigned this activity to save time. I had to be out with my sick son last Tuesday, and we were a day behind. Not a big deal in the grand scheme of things, but a huge deal when you are trying to teach the history of the world in 18 weeks. There is no time to spare.
 
 
 
I have this manor pop-up activity that I like to do with the middle ages, but it takes an entire block, and we just didn’t have that much time to spare.
 
So I went with the quick way to teach medieval manors that I mentioned above. And it should have been perfect. Quick. Easy. It hit the high points.
 
No sooner did the students begin working on the activity than hands began shooting up. With impatient sophomores, that in and of itself is a recipe for disaster. Add to the mix any free time, and forget about it. You’re outnumbered. You might as well go ahead and raise the white flag.
 
They could access the website for the virtual tour, but they could not view the tour because Adobe Flash was not enabled on their Chromebooks.
 
I had to think fast. I took one student’s Chromebook and tried to install Flash. No go. The natives were getting restless, so I did what anybody would do in 2017. I googled the problem. It turns out it was an easy fix:
 
Go the the URL address bar in Chrome.
Type “Chrome://plugin” (no quotation marks).
Check the box “always enable” for Adobe Flash.
 
 
Have you run into the issue of not being able to access a website due to Adobe Flash not being enabled? This happened to me during a recent lesson, and after a quick in-class Google, I figured out how to enable Adobe Flash on a Chromebook. This short blog post explains exactly how to fix this problem so that you don't run into the same mid-class problem that I did!

Problem solved for the Chromebook.

 
Check out the (now) quick and simple activity HERE.

As for getting it to work on an IPad–you have to go through the Apple Store for that. Apple has its own version of Flash, so it doesn’t let Adobe run. Unfortunately, that will cost you. You’ll have to get an Apple approved app.

Apple does support HTML5, though, which is starting to replace Flash around the web, so this will all be moot in a couple of years (probably).

Be sure to stick around and check out the other posts in my Blended Classroom Tips and Tricks series.


And be sure to let us know about your tips and tricks in the comments below!

Google Forms now has a self-grading quiz feature! When I wrote about Google Forms in the past, you needed to have an add-on in order to make your quizzes in Google Classroom self-grading. However, Google Forms has updated since then, and now you can make your quizzes self-grading. In this blog post, I walk you through a step-by-step tutorial of how to set this up in your own Google Classroom!
Do you struggle with cell phones in the classroom? They can be excellent tools for learning, but more often than not, they are a huge distraction. Check out this post about some of the ways students can use their portable devices for nefarious purposes and how the 1:1 classroom can offer a solution.

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