Collaborative Testing and New Year’s Freebies

This is how we usually test in my classroom:

Collaborative testing is a strategy that secondary teachers might consider using sparingly in their classrooms. While individual testing certainly has its merits and its place, collaborative testing allows students to show what they know in a new way and to discuss and debate answers with a partner. Read more in this post.

We break out the dividers, and close ourselves off. Talking is a cardinal sin, and we look down, down, down. That’s how testing should be, right? Well…yes. Most of the time.

But last week, we tried something new. Collaborative testing.

Collaborative testing is a strategy that secondary teachers might consider using sparingly in their classrooms. While individual testing certainly has its merits and its place, collaborative testing allows students to show what they know in a new way and to discuss and debate answers with a partner. Read more in this post.

Notice, the dividers are stacked against the wall, and interactive notebooks are out. This is not a strategy I would use often, but I will use it occasionally. Here’s why:

1. The students were focused.
2. They discussed questions.
3. They searched for answers.
4. In several cases, they chose not to answer as their partner did, but they explained why.

In short, they considered and discussed each response.

It was astounding to watch. I believe using it too often would cause the strategy to lose its effectiveness. Plus, a test definitely has value as an individual assessment.

But used sparingly, it encourages collaboration and debate.

The activity I’m having them do in the new year is the opposite–it encourages reflection and introspection. Students compare historical New Year’s Resolutions to current ones and use foldables to create a booklet of their own.

Collaborative testing is a strategy that secondary teachers might consider using sparingly in their classrooms. While individual testing certainly has its merits and its place, collaborative testing allows students to show what they know in a new way and to discuss and debate answers with a partner. Read more in this post.

Collaborative testing is a strategy that secondary teachers might consider using sparingly in their classrooms. While individual testing certainly has its merits and its place, collaborative testing allows students to show what they know in a new way and to discuss and debate answers with a partner. Read more in this post.

Collaborative testing is a strategy that secondary teachers might consider using sparingly in their classrooms. While individual testing certainly has its merits and its place, collaborative testing allows students to show what they know in a new way and to discuss and debate answers with a partner. Read more in this post.

Collaborative testing is a strategy that secondary teachers might consider using sparingly in their classrooms. While individual testing certainly has its merits and its place, collaborative testing allows students to show what they know in a new way and to discuss and debate answers with a partner. Read more in this post.

You can get it for free here:

New Year's Resolutions
Get it Here!

It’s also featured in the Arts and Humanities Teachers Pay Teachers Winter Holiday Ebook. This book is full of tips and free gifts from fabulous teacher-authors. It’s a gem, and there’s one for every grade level. Thanks a million to Julie Faulkner for taking the time to put this one together:

Arts and Humanities Teachers Pay Teachers Winter Holiday Ebook
Get it Here!

Speaking of fabulous teacher-authors, check out my fantastic free finds for this week:

On the management end of the spectrum, this lesson plan template from Michele Luck’s Social Studies is perfect for planning a whole unit:

Lesson Plan Template
Get it Here!

This high school freebie is an amazing deal from Jamie Edwards—Write On! It includes a PowerPoint, worksheets, and common core aligned lesson plans on teaching the writing process:

Introduction to Writing: The Stages of Writing
Get it Here!

And for teaching a difficult concept to the younger students or struggling readers, you can’t beat this Inference Carousel Activity from The Teacher Treasury, complete with pictures, captions, and worksheets:

Making Inferences Picture #6
Get it Here!

Have you ever given collaborative tests? Leave a comment below, and let me know!

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